Shearsby, 8 May 1834: Accident while driving thrashing machine

Image: By Unknown (Dictionnaire d’arts industriels) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons. Threshing machine from 1881 with few safety features present.

ACCIDENT. – On Thursday 8th instant, Mr. Goode, a respectable farmer of Shearsby, met with a serious accident from a thrashing machine which he was using on his premises. Whilst in the act of driving, his foot unfortunately slipped, and came into contact with the horse-wheel, and was so dreadfully mutilated as to render amputation necessary. Owing to the skill and attention of the surgeon, Mr. Colston, of Husbands Bosworth, the case is going on well. – It would be desirable, we think, that machines should be so far enclosed as to prevent such accidents.

From: The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, May 17, 1834;

In the 1841 Census there was a farmer living in Back Street named John Goode. He lived with his wife Mary;  children Richard, Susannah and Caroline; a female servant named Maria Elkington and Hannah Read’s son Emmanuel. Emmanuel was working as a chimney sweep, where perhaps his youth, at age 15, would be an advantage to him.

‘Contact with machinery’ is still regarded as cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries in agricultural settings.

Health and Safety Executive, Farmwise: Your essential guide to health and safety in agriculture  2nd ed. ISBN 97807176 65792 [online]

© 2017. This page is best viewed on the WordPress site on which it was written. That way the author gets to see that someone has read some of the stories, and it is kind of encouraging, you know.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s