Shearsby, 8 May 1834: Accident while driving thrashing machine

Image: By Unknown (Dictionnaire d’arts industriels) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons. Threshing machine from 1881 with few safety features present.

ACCIDENT. – On Thursday 8th instant, Mr. Goode, a respectable farmer of Shearsby, met with a serious accident from a thrashing machine which he was using on his premises. Whilst in the act of driving, his foot unfortunately slipped, and came into contact with the horse-wheel, and was so dreadfully mutilated as to render amputation necessary. Owing to the skill and attention of the surgeon, Mr. Colston, of Husbands Bosworth, the case is going on well. – It would be desirable, we think, that machines should be so far enclosed as to prevent such accidents.

From: The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, May 17, 1834;

In the 1841 Census there was a farmer living in Back Street named John Goode. He lived with his wife Mary;  children Richard, Susannah and Caroline; a female servant named Maria Elkington and Hannah Read’s son Emmanuel. Emmanuel was working as a chimney sweep, where perhaps his youth, at age 15, would be an advantage to him.

‘Contact with machinery’ is still regarded as cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries in agricultural settings.

Health and Safety Executive, Farmwise: Your essential guide to health and safety in agriculture  2nd ed. ISBN 97807176 65792 [online]

 

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