SP625914: Bull Hooks, ‘an ancient enclosure’

Thomas Mitchell and John Ward were the overseers of the poor for the parish of Shearsby at the time of the Enclosure Act in 1773. Among its many provisions, the enclosure re-allocated lands to these overseers and their successors to manage for the benefit of the parish in exchange for other pieces previously held. One field, called Bull Hooks, was particularly identified for that purpose.

The land was described as ‘an ancient enclosure’, so must have been marked out and known by that name before 1773. It was bounded by the Turnpike Road to the west and south and now sits between The Old Road and the modern line of the A5199. To its north and east was land allotted to George Turville and to the west by land allotted to Richard Turville. The area amounted to 3 roods and 26 perches. Bounding the field were mounds and fences which Mitchell and Ward, as overseers and George Turville were required to maintain.

The land may have stayed in village hands until the assets of many local charities were liquidated to fund the extension of the Lutterworth Union in taking on the role of supporting the poor in the surrounding villages. The proceeds from this field and other properties whose rents supported the work of the overseers was distributed at different times in the year, like the St. Thomas Day distribution of fuel to act as a winter fuel allowance. In the parochial returns sent in to the House of Commons in 1818 Shearsby’s poor, at 23 people out of 260 amounted to between 8% and 9% of the village population.

John Ward was born in Shearsby and baptised in the village church on 9 May 1742. His parents were William and Ann Ward. ‘Thomas Mitchell’ is a common name in eighteenth-century Leicestershire, but the one born nearest to Shearsby would have been son of James Mitchel of Kibworth Beauchamp, baptised on 25 Jun 1714.

References

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4M-FLKQ : 6 June 2018), John Ward, 9 May 1742; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Baptism, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page , Citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4S-RTG2 : 6 June 2018), Thomas Mitchel, 25 Jun 1714; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Baptism, Kibworth Beauchamp, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page , Citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

Great Britain (1818). A digest of parochial returns made to the Select Committee appointed to inquire into the Education of the Poor, Vol. 1. London, House of Commons [online]  accessed 01/11/2018

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Thomas Ward, 1774-1841. Shearsby Miller

Thomas Ward was the son on William and Ann Ward and christened in Shearsby on 11 December 1774. Three years later his brother William was also born and christened in the village. Both brothers lived in the village: William, a farmer, was found in Back Street in 1841. On William’s death in 1847 a joint gravestone was set up for them in the churchyard.

Thomas married Ann Simonds in Shearsby on 02 Feb 1818. She may have been the Ann Simons christened in the Lutterworth Independent Chapel on 29 May 1798. Their daughter Elizabeth Simons Ward was christened in the village in January 1819.

In the 1841 Census Thomas was living in Mill Street and stated his occupation as as miller. Also in the household were Ann (~65), Elizabeth (~20) and two stocking-makers, Alice (55) and Mary (22) Allen. John Wylde, also living in Mill Street, was also noted as a miller, as his father had also been before his untimely death.

It was only shortly after the census, on 28 April, that Thomas died and he was buried in the village churchyard on 2 May 1841.

References

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPW1-KH22 : 6 June 2018), Thos Ward, 11 Dec 1774; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Baptism, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page , Citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPW1-5PM6 : 6 June 2018), William Ward, 1 Dec 1777; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Baptism, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page , Citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

“England Marriages, 1538–1973 ,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NK5D-K8N : 10 February 2018), Thomas Ward and Ann Simonds, 02 Feb 1818; citing Shearsby,Leicester,England, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 585,287, 595,767.

“England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JW8X-8DH : 11 February 2018, Elizabeth Simons Ward, 03 Jan 1819); citing , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 595,767

“England and Wales Census, 1841,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MQYK-BFR : 13 December 2017), Ann Ward in household of Thomas Ward, Knaptoft, Leicestershire, England; from “1841 England, Scotland and Wales census,” database and images, findmypast(http://www.findmypast.com : n.d.); citing PRO HO 107, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey.

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4Q-T312 : 6 June 2018), Thomas Ward, 2 May 1841; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Burial, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page 24, citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

Shearsby, New Inn, July 1842: A crowd of between 50 and 60 people assembled and dared the police to take any of them

Lutterworth Petty Sessions, Thursday July 28. (Before J. A. Arnold and R. Gough, Esqrs.)

Joseph Bott and Ebenezer Tristram Jones were charged with assaulting Superintendent Frie. Defendents had been ejected for making a disturbance at the New Inn, Shearsby; subsequently a crowd of between fifty and sixty people assembled and dared the police to take any of them. Jones, taking an active part, was secured. An attempt was then made to rescue him; and Bott, being one of the leaders, was taken into custody, and conveyed to the lock-up. Convicted in penalty and costs 10s. each.

The name ‘Ebenezer Tristram Jones’ is surprisingly common in Leicester, from whence he and presumably Bott came. The 50 or 60 people who assembled so quickly may have been more local though.

The following year Superintendent Frie had again to deal with disorderly drunkenness in Shearsby, apprehending Job Whitmore, William Bottrell and Thomas Hardy on the morning of the 4th July. They wer brought before the justices at the Lutterworth Petty Sessions on 20 July and each fined 3s with costs of 5s 4d.

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, July 30, 1842;

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, March 04, 1837

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, June 10, 1843

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, July 22, 1843, p2.

Oadby, 4 September 1867: Properties of Thomas Simons auctioned

On the 3rd of July 1867 Mr. Thomas Simons died at the advanced age of 94.  A few years earlier the census had found him living on London Road, Oadby as a retired grocer with 10 year-old Jane Simons (his nephew Richard’s daughter), and a servant from Lutterworth. Back in 1851 he had been living in Main Street, Oadby, unmarried, with his younger sister Susannah. Susannah had died in March 1856 and been buried in Shearsby. Their father was Thomas Simons, long-time clerk to the village of Shearsby, who had also lived to a good age.

In September 1867 the properties of Thomas Simons in Oadby and Shearsby were put up for auction at the White Horse Inn, Oadby. There were to be two lots of Oadby properties and three lots for those in Shearsby.

The Robert Simons mentioned had been born in 1811, probably in Oadby, and had, in May 1842, married Mary Williams (b.1817), from Shearsby. In 1851 he was living in Oadby as a beer seller and grocer. He died and was buried in Shearsby in 1872.

Oadby

Lot 1. All that brick-built dwelling House and Shop, with suitable offices at the back thereof, situate and being in the centre of the pleasant village of Oadby aforesaid, with a large productive garden at the back thereof, late in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Simons, deceased.

And also all those three messuages or tenements, adjoining the above, fronting to the main street, with two Workshops and good Gardens at the back thereof, the whole containing a frontage of about 82 feet.

Lot 2. All that Dwelling House, with Grocer’s Shop, Bakehouse, Stable, Piggeries, and numerous out-offices, together with a good garden at the back thereof, situate in the main street, in Oadby, aforesaid, for several years in the occupation of Mr. Robert Simons, containing a frontage of about 54 feet.

Shearsby

Lot 1. All those three messuages or tenements, with Cow-house, Piggeries, and other Out-offices, together with a productive Orchard and Garden, situate in the centre of the village of Shearsby aforesaid, containing three roods or thereabouts, and now in the several occupations of Richard Simons, William Deacon and – Lee, and containing a frontage of 129 feet or thereabouts.

Lot 2. All that piece or parcel of land, situate at the upper-end of the village of Shearsby aforesaid, near the mill, and now in the occupation of Richard Simons, containing one acre or thereabouts.

Lot 3. All those two messuages or tenements, with out-offices, garden and yard attached, situate at the top of the main street of Shearsby aforesaid, now in the occupation of Thomas Simons, and containing a frontage of 47 feet or thereabouts.

References

The Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury (Leicester, England), Saturday, August 31, 1867;

The Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury (Leicester, England), Saturday, July 06, 1867; pg. 8

“England and Wales Census, 1861,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://www.familysearch.org/frontier/search-artifact/ark:/61903/1:1:M75P-Q5K December 2017), Thomas Simons, Oadby, Leicestershire, England; from “1861 England, Scotland and Wales census,” database and images, findmypast (http://www.findmypast.com : n.d.); citing PRO RG 9, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey.

 

Shearsby, 4 December 1843: the late Mr. READ, deceased

It fell to friend and fellow-farmer Richard Messenger to manage the disposal of the estate of Thomas Read after his death on 12 November 1843. He arranged the burial in the Shearsby church-yard and, the following month, supervised the sale of ‘the whole of the livestock, hay, farming implements, household furniture, brewing and dairy utensils, etc.’ which was held over two days on the late grazier’s premises in Back Street.

The burial records have Thomas as being born in 1775. In census of 1841 he was living with Elizabeth and Susannah Read, both 40 in the census takers rounded figures.  Elizabeth was born in 1797 and Susannah  in 1801.  A child, Louisa Wylde, was also present. Ann Read (born 1809) had married John Wylde in August 1830, so Louisa may have been their child and grand-daughter to Thomas. Thomas’ wife, Elizabeth, had died in April 1837. She was the daughter of Ralph and Ann Hobill. The couple had married on 29 December 1796.

His gravestone poetically records his frustrations with the abilities of the local doctors:

Afflictions sore long time I bore,
Physicians were in vain;
Till God did please to give me ease,
And free me from all pain.

References

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database,FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4Q-B13P : 6 June 2018), Thomas Read, 15 Nov 1843; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Burial, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page 25, citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

“England, Leicestershire Parish Registers, 1533-1991,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4W-QD1J : 6 June 2018), Thomas Read and Elizabeth Hobill, 29 Dec 1796; records extracted by findmypast, images digitized by FamilySearch; citing Marriage, Shearsby, Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom, page 4, citing the Record Office of Leicestershire, Leicester, and Rutland, Wigston, UK.

“England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NP44-8ZQ : 11 February 2018, Elizabeth Hobill, 07 Dec 1777); citing , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 590,856.

Leicestershire, May 1829: The crimes of horse, cattle and sheep-stealing having greatly increased…

How, in the days before a national police service, did communities like Shearsby in the early nineteenth-century respond to the threat of crime? One answer was to encourage mutual support through associations for the conviction of felons.

In May 1829 both Job and William Walker, of Shearsby, signed up to become founder members of the Leicestershire General Association for the Prosecution of Horse, Cattle and Sheep-Stealers. This organisation had been established as the “crimes of horse, cattle and sheep-stealing having greatly increased within the County of Leicester, and which the partial associations of small districts have proved inadequate to check, it has been thought that a general Association extending over the whole county, would, by providing a more effective means to detect offenders, materially tend to diminish the offences”.

Having decided to form this association, the organisers were keen to use the Social Media of the day; regional and local newspapers. Notices were placed in the Leicester Herald and Leicester Chronicle newspapers in the early Summer of 1829 that not only alerted the public to the existence of this association, but also highlighted an element of celebrity endorsement by listing the names of those members of the nobility and gentry already persuaded to sign up.

These included the Marquis of Hastings, Earl of Denbigh, Earl Howe and Lord Southampton; one Bart., twenty-four Esquires and a number of lesser ‘misters’. There were a number of people named as associated with places, like the Walkers of Shearsby. These seemed to form a network of South Leicestershire farmers, including R. Oldacres and J. Stevens of Arnesby, William Higgs of Mowesley; F. Breedon and J. Knight of Saddington; W. Hobill and J. Waldram of Bruntingthorpe; W. Hall and W. Wayte of Great Peatling among others.

There was, at this time, no national or even local police service covering the county. Prosecutions, such as that against the unfortunate Peberdy, had to be arranged and funded privately. It was also left to the Ross family themselves to raise a reward and appeal for information on the whereabouts of their absconding son George, who is presumed to have funded his plans to emigrate to America without the knowledge of his parents and employers.

Example of voluntarism and neighbourliness can be seen in the alert issued to readers of local newspapers about the impostor claiming to be the father of triplets.

References

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, May 30, 1829

Leicester Herald (Leicester, England), Wednesday, June 3, 1829

Koyama, M. (2012) “Prosecution Associations in Industrial Revolution England: Private Providers of Public Goods?”, The Journal of Legal Studies, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 95-130.

Koyama, M. (2014) “The law & economics of private prosecutions in industrial revolution England”, Public Choice, vol. 159, no. 1, pp. 277-298.

“England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JWZY-4JT : 11 February 2018, Job Walker, 03 Mar 1782); citing SHEARSBY,LEICESTER,ENGLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 585,287.

Shearsby, 14 April 1845: Mr Blockley leaves the farm

An auction was held at Thomas Blockley’s farm premises in Shearsby on 14 April 1845. The lots for sale give an idea of the style of agriculture being practiced in the parish in the mid-nineteenth century. They included:

  • 40 ewes and lambs
  • 55 lambhogs: 2nd year lambs
  • 4 shearhogs: lamb between first and second shearing
  • 1 dairy cow
  • 1 superior in-calved cow
  • 2 young cows (heifers), expecting their first calves
  • 2 sturk heifers: one to two years old
  • 5 2-year old steers: Defined by Baker (1854) as “a bullock, after it is one year old, till it enters its fourth year, when it is termed an ox”.
  • 3 yearling calves
  • 2 7-year old cart horses
  • 1 5-year old superior harness horse
  • 1 hackney mare
  • 1 foal, sired by Mundig
  • 2 pigs
  • 2 4 1/2 inch carts
  • Ploughs, harrows, horse tackle, etc.
  • 60 acres of grass-keeping rented until the 10th October

There is a mix here of sheep for grazing and other animal to support domestic consumption. The foal “by Mundig” (a horse well known in fox-hunting circles) may be an indicator of the social pursuits of its owner.

There were no members of the Blockley family present in the village when the 1841 Census was taken. They may have arrived since that date or merely been visiting elsewhere at the time. One William Blockley, born in nearby Bruntingthorpe in 1830, would have been a teenager at the time of this move. He married Elizabeth Bottrell, 4 years his younger and from Shearsby, in August 1851. They brought up a family in Bruntingthorpe.

References

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, April 05, 1845; pg. [1]

Baker, Anne Elizabeth (1854) Glossary of Northamptonshire words and phrases · 1st edition, London: J.R. Smith

 

Featured image: taken from page 415 of ‘Angol-Skóthoni napló 1858 és 1859 évekről

Shearsby, 9 July 1844: Petticoat crimewave

Both Susannah Goode and Susannah Geary had found their petticoats stolen from their Tuesday washing lines, while neighbour Richard Highton (47), a wheelwright living on High Street, discovered the loss of a pan, a ladle and two stockings. These thefts were traced to one George Sutton (35). At the Leicestershire Midsummer Assizes the following month, George, having pleaded guilty, was sentenced to four months hard labour.

Susannah Goode lived with her family on Back Street. She had been born in High Cross in Leicester in 1823. This was the same family who had taken in the homeless boy, Emanuel Read. Later that year, on 3 November at the village church,  she married 24-year old Shearsby farmer James Williams.

Susannah Geary also lived on High Street and was in her late sixties. In the 1841 Census she was recorded as living alone but ‘independent’. The year  after these thefts she died and was buried in the churchyard on 26 May. She had, perhaps, been born Susannah Blackwell in June 1774 to parents Jonathan and Hannah. The notice of her death in the newspapers recorded that she was the widow of the late J. Geary, Gent.  of Higham, in Northamptonshire.

Ann Heighton, Richard’s wife, also had Northamptonshire connections as she had been born in Cottingham in 1793. Richard was 5 years younger and born in Shearsby. He described himself as a wheelwright in 1841 and carpenter 10 years later, when he lived in School Square with his son George, aged 20 and also a carpenter. Two older brothers Richard and William were not present for the 1851 census having been earlier apprenticed to their father. A young girl, Elizabeth Heighton, born in 1847, was staying with her grandfather Robert Chance, a grazier of Hill Street in 1851.

The perpetrator, George Sutton, from the evidence of the 1841 and 1851 censuses, seems not to have had strong Shearsby connections, there being no-one of this surname in the village on those occasions.

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, August 10, 1844; pg. [1]

The Leicester Chronicle: or, Commercial and Agricultural Advertiser (Leicester, England), Saturday, June 07, 1845;

New Inn, Shearsby, June 1848: Prince Albert’s Own Yeomanry Cavalry undeceived

Leicestershire Mercury, 24 June 1848: We hear that a hoax was played upon some of P.A.O. Yeomanry Cavalry at Shearsby, last week, letters having been sent them to appear at a certain place quick as possible like good men and true. They obeyed their order, and soon appeared at Shearsby Inn, where they were undeceived. They then stopped and spent the remainder of the day in merriment, instead of with the Chartists. These hoaxes are very discreditable to the parties who play them [commented the Editor of the Leicestershire Mercury].

The site of this merriment was, most likely, the New Inn on the Leicester to Welford Turnpike Road. It was known as a popular starting point for hunts and would have been familiar to the cavalrymen of the Yeomanry. There were other public houses in the village, of course, though only one known as an Inn. What the Chartists managed to achieve in their Yeomanry-free day is not here recorded.

This is not the only 1848 connection between the village and the Yeomanry. William and Mary Elliott’s son John was serving in Captain Haymes’ troop of the Prince Albert’s Own. He had been born in the Waterloo year of 1815 so would have been in his thirties by this time. In the inspections of the Yeomanry at Leicester on 29 September, Private John Elliott, of Shearsby, won first prize for his horse.

References

Leicestershire Mercury (Leicester, England), Saturday 24 June 1848.

Leicester Journal (Leicester, England), Friday 6 October 1848.

Featured image: Quartermaster J. Kirk of the Leicester Yeomanry Cavalry, 1841. Online

Shearsby, Harvest-time, 1790: Mr. Throsby’s Excursion

It was a fine autumn day when John Throsby arrived in Shearsby. He had enjoyed a pleasant journey for 9 miles or so along the Turnpike Road south from Leicester towards Welford and had arrived at his first stop of his planned excursion. Though the 60 houses of the village appeared empty, Mr. Wyatt had, as agreed, remained behind to show him round. Everyone else was busily engaged in bringing in the harvest.

Throsby was the Parish Clerk at St. Martin’s Church in Leicester, but this role was not so onerous as to get in the way of his historical and antiquarian interests. He had published his research into the history of the County from pre-roman times onwards in 1777-78. In 1790 he was engaged in publishing his illustrations of the ‘Select views in Leicestershire from original drawings containing the seats of the nobility and gentry, town views and ruins‘. The supplementary volume to this was to be a record of a series of excursions into notable parts of the county, which is what had set him on his way to the village that morning.

Around Shearsby he found 1100 acres (445 hectares) of good land, mostly in the hands of George Turvile, though his guide Mr. Wyatt himself obtained about 80 pounds a year from his portion. The manor was thought to have belonged to the wealthy Bradgate’s of Peatling before the Turviles, or so Wyatt had heard. Throsby was taken round the church as the principal building of the village.

The church, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, stands ‘on a mound, like the mound of a castle’ and its tower had been erected the previous year, by the local landowners. If there was any doubt about this, an inscription mounted on the outside of the tower reminds all who pass by that “this steeple was re-built at the expense of the landowners of this lordship A.D. 1789”. The tower has two stages and is mostly built from limestone ashlar.

The old steeple had held a statue of the saint, which now stood in the chancel. The four bells also remained in the chancel, giving Wyatt a chance to show them off to his visitor. Throsby was not normally interested in bells, but made an exception in Shearsby’s case, as this did not require him to clamour up steep ladders and to inspect dusty belfries. The mundane things you could learn from church bell inscriptions did not excite him, however, he did enjoy the tale of how one of the bells had got to be there.

One of the bells had been originally cast in 1620 for the now ruined church in the next parish a mile away in Knaptoft. It was the Duke of Rutland who appointed the clergy for the parish and one day the sons of one of his tenants had turned up to take the bell back to their belfry in Aylestone. Having loaded it on to their cart they stopped off in Shearsby as the nearest place of refreshment on their journey back. The young men may have enjoyed their drinks, but they left the village without the bell, where it has remained ever since.

During his visit to St. Mary Magdalen’s back in the 1770s, Archdeacon Bickham had recommended stopping up the belfry in the tower to protect the parishioners from draughts and distractions and allow the bell-ringers to get on with their jobs undisturbed. It had been decided to rebuild rather than repair the belfry though.

If Wyatt included the handsome memorial to members of his own ancestors in his tour, Throsby did not mention it. He did notice the memorials to Richard Turvile (d. 1719, aged 89), Robert Holmes M.A. (d. 1692), John Sprigg (d. 1728) and John Seal (d. 1735, aged 81). Tablets on the church wall informed visitors of the charitable bequests of Mr. Simon Ward to see the poor kept warm  and Mr. Seal to keep them fed (at least at Christmas).

Throsby’s attention was then drawn to the Parish Registers which began in 1658. He compared the most recent 5 years with the first 5 of the register, noting the increase in baptisms (by 15) and the decrease in burials (by 8) as a positive sign.

His excursion then continued onwards to Knaptoft, remembering the John Ball hill as one at which ‘many a galled [chaffed, sore] horse has winced’ in ascending in the days before the Turnpike Road was opened.

References

Select views in Leicestershire, from original … v.2. Throsby, John, 1740-1803. pp196-7

Historic England. Church of St Mary Magdalen.

Pemberton, W.A. 1984, “The Parochial Visitation of James Bickham D.D. Archdeacon of Leicester in the Years 1773 to 1779”, Transactions of the Leicestershire Archaeological and Historical Society, vol. 59, pp. 52.

Featured image: By Robert Thoroton, John Throsby (authors of volume); unknown illustrator of title page (Google books [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons